As any parent knows, it can be difficult to communicate with your teen, especially when it comes to a sensitive topic like dating violence. Perhaps you’re not quite sure what to say, or maybe your teen doesn’t seem to want to talk.

According to the Domestic Violence Awareness Project, approximately 1.5 million high school students in the United States experience physical abuse from a dating partner. One-quarter of parents don’t talk to their teens about domestic violence.

Whatever stage you and your teen are going through in discussing and learning about dating violence — whether you want to teach them about healthy relationships for the future, or you’re concerned with a relationship they are currently in and want to give them advice — there are plenty of resources that can be helpful.

According to the Domestic Violence Awareness Project, approximately 1.5 million high school students in the United States experience physical abuse from a dating partner. One-quarter of parents don’t talk to their teens about domestic violence.

Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month encourages parents and adolescents to take an inventory of their relationships. Abuse includes physical, psychological or sexual abuse. Visit youth.govloveisrespect.orgbreakthecycle.org for conversation starters and resources.

 

NATIONAL TEEN DATING ABUSE HELPLINE
If you or someone you know has been the victim of dating violence, free and confidential help is available:

loveisrespect: Call 1-866-331-9474,

chat at loveisrespect.org

or text “loveis” to 22522, any time, 24/7/365.

 

Break the cycle. Start the conversation.  Use #teenDVmonth and #loveisrespect to share on social media.

Icon symbol of struggle and awareness, purple ribbon
Icon symbol of struggle and awareness, purple ribbon